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For major pruning, the best time is in early spring before the plant is ready to put out new growth, so it has the full growing season to fill out and for the new growth to mature.

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When pruning azaleas to reduce height, particularly older plants, it is best to do the pruning in stages, to minimize the shock to the shrubpruning.buzzted Reading Time: 2 mins. Feb 09, Do not significantly prune azaleas in the fall or you will lose next spring’s blooms.

How to Prune Azaleas. Most azaleas are just going to need a little shaping and thinning, to maintain size and health. This is easy asand why azaleas and rhododendrons are considered low maintenance.

Step 1 - wait until the flowers die off in the spring to prune. Step 2 - cut off dead branches and stems from the shrub. Aug 30, The answer is: no. Why? Because you want to avoid cutting off fall-produced flower buds that will be next spring's blooms. Too, mid to late fall pruning can stimulate tender new foliage that could be damaged or killed by an early frost or freezing temperatures.

So, to avoid problems, cease pruning evergreen azaleas in mid-summer. Sep 10, You will require both hand clippers and loppers to prune overgrown azaleas. Use clippers for limbs smaller than ½ inch in diameter, and use loppers for branches ½.

The ideal time to give your azaleas a trim is within a three-week period after they finish blooming in spring. This gives the azaleas plenty of time to make flower buds (which appear as pale, fuzzy buds curled tight on the tips of branches) for next year. If you wait until the late summer or fall to prune, you risk cutting off the flower buds. Major Azalea Pruning When azaleas grow too big for their surroundings, they may need to be pruned drastically.

You can cut overgrown plants down to about 1 foot in height. Then feed them with a slow-release, water-soluble fertilizer. Frequently water the plants you cut back to encourage a flush of suckers from the stumps.